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Push, Pull, Next!

Push, Pull, Next!

July 06, 2005

In a recent weblog post, XML.com's "Python and XML" columnist Uche Ogbuji provided a nice collection of links to discussions about the push vs. pull styles of XSLT stylesheet development. What do we mean by "push" and "pull"? As a short example of each, let's look at two approaches to converting the following DocBook document to XHTML:



<book>
  <title>Beneath the Underdog</title>
  <para>In other words, I am three.</para>
  <para>"Which one is real?"</para>
  <para>"They're all real."</para>
</book>

The first stylesheet below takes a push approach. The XSLT processor "pushes" the source tree nodes through the stylesheet, which has template rules to handle various kinds of nodes as they come through:


<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
                version="1.0">

  <xsl:template match="book">
    <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
      <head>
        <title><xsl:value-of select="book/title"/></title>
      </head>
      <body>
        <xsl:apply-templates/>
      </body>
    </html>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="para">
    <p><xsl:apply-templates/></p>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="title">
    <h1><xsl:apply-templates/></h1>
  </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

Each xsl:apply-templates instruction is the stylesheet's way of telling the XSLT processor to send along the context node's child nodes to the stylesheet's relevant template rules. (Or, to quote Curtis Mayfield, "Keep On Pushing.")

A pull-style stylesheet minimizes the use of xsl:apply-template instructions. It uses instructions such as xsl:value-of and xsl:for-each to retrieve the nodes it wants and then puts them where it needs them, like this:


<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
                version="1.0">

  <xsl:template match="/">
    <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
      <head>
        <title><xsl:value-of select="book/title"/></title>
      </head>
      <body>
        <h1><xsl:value-of select="book/title"/></h1>
        <xsl:for-each select="book/para">
          <p><xsl:value-of select="."/></p>
        </xsl:for-each>
      </body>
    </html>
  </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

Few stylesheets rely strictly on push or pull processing. For example, while my first stylesheet above includes a template rule to convert the title element into an h1 element when it comes along, it needs to explicitly go get the title value to plug it into the XHTML head element's title element. The use of such a simple source document also made the pull example a little too clean and simple; in the real third paragraph of the book Beneath the Underdog, the word "all" is emphasized, and a pure pull style approach to handling in-line content would require contortions that doubled the length of the stylesheet.

The pull style can feel more natural to developers intimidated by XSLT's roots in the functional programming style used by its ancestors DSSSL, Scheme, and LISP. A pure pull stylesheet like the one above has one template rule that tells the XSLT processor, "When you find the root node of the source document, do this, then do this, then do this, then do this..." It's a series of steps to perform, as with a typical declarative programming language. Other template rules in such a stylesheet are usually named template rules—that is, template rules with name attributes that get explicitly called with xsl:call-template instructions instead of being called when the XSLT processor finds a node matching the condition described in the template rule's match attribute. (An xsl:template element can have both a match attribute and a name attribute, but typical template rules have one or the other.) These named template rules play the role of the subroutines or procedures of a procedural programming language, adding modularity to a growing program the old-fashioned way.

A Matter of Style

Considering XSLT's functional roots, though, I find the pull approach to be unnatural, and it scales up badly. I have minimal experience with functional languages—I never got beyond toy examples with DSSSL and I struggled a bit with Scheme and LISP school. I do have a theory why I never had such problems with the structure of XSLT stylesheets: those of us who began our document processing careers in the SGML days don't see XSLT as a successor to DSSSL (which few people used in production applications) but as a successor to Omnimark, which is what most developers used to turn SGML into something else. Omnimark is a pattern matching language that uses a streaming model, like today's SAX interfaces, and an Omnimark script is structured almost like a series of event handlers: when a title element comes along, do this with it; when a para element comes along, do that with it, and so forth.

Thinking of XSLT as an event-driven environment has served me pretty well if I consider the XSLT processor's discovery of various kinds of nodes as the events to write handlers for. I won't push the analogy to event-driven development too far, but I will say that it works much better than attempts to shoehorn XSLT into the declarative, "do this, then this, then this," style of a purist pull approach.

Stylesheets that use the push approach also make debugging easier. Usually, when I see people ask for help with a stylesheet, they're hoping that a one- or two-line change will fix their problem. I often look at one of these stylesheets, which typically have a minimal number of template rules each trying to execute too much program logic, and I think, "If they just rewrote it with more template rules to handle the different source node types, this would be easy to fix." Of course, telling people to revise the whole architecture of their stylesheet is not what they want to hear, so I'll rewrite part of their stylesheet using a push approach to demonstrate "one approach to the problem."

In a panel discussion on XSLT, I once asked Michael Kay what aspect of XSLT was most underused and underappreciated. I expected him to name some little-known instruction, function, or xsl:output attribute, and he surprised me with his reply that template rules—the most fundamental unit of an XSLT stylesheet—weren't used enough. A comparison of my two stylesheets above, though, demonstrates his point: a set of template rules can usually express the logic necessary to handle a source document's elements and attributes better than a single template rule with lots of xsl:if and xsl:choose instructions inside of it to express the processing logic for that application. This is especially true with publishing-oriented (or "document-oriented") XML documents, with their irregular structure and in-line elements, because a pull stylesheet can have a difficult time finding find the specific pieces of information it needs in such documents.

Pull Advantages?

Keeping the program logic for multiple classes of nodes in one template rule can be an advantage if you want to perform some specific steps on each node type, as well as some other steps on all those nodes. For example, let's say I want to wrap every member element from the following sample document in a p element.


<members>
  <member joinDate="2003-10-03">Jimmy Osterberg</member>
  <member joinDate="2005-03-07">Declan McManus</member>
  <member joinDate="2003-10-03">Richard Starkey</member>
  <member joinDate="2004-08-23">Vincent Furnier</member>
</members>

I want to precede each with a p element that says "(founding member)" if the joinDate date equals "2003-10-03", and with a p element of "(new member)" if the joinDate attribute begins with "2005". The following does this easily in a single template rule:


<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
                version="1.0">

  <xsl:template match="member">

    <xsl:if test="@joinDate='2003-10-03'">
      <p>(founding member)</p>
    </xsl:if>

    <xsl:if test="substring(@joinDate,1,4) = '2005'">
      <p>(new member)</p>
    </xsl:if>

    <p><xsl:apply-templates/></p>

  </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

XSLT 2.0: New Options

XSLT 2.0 offers another approach. The xsl:next-match element tells the XSLT processor to find the next most applicable template rule for the context node being processed and apply it, letting you apply multiple template rules to a node while still using a push approach. Normally, when multiple template rules all have match conditions that can describe the same element (for example, if one template rule has a match condition of "*", another has one of "member," and another has one of "member[@joinDate='2003-10-03']," they can all apply to the first member element shown above), the XSLT processor applies the one with the most specific description to the node—in this case, the one with a match condition of "member[@joinDate='2003-10-03']." (The choice is actually made based on a priority number to help judge how specific the description is. You can override this by explicitly setting a priority attribute value in the template rule.)

While an XSLT processor processes a particular node in a template rule, the xsl:next-match instruction tells it, "Go find the next most appropriate template rule after this one, execute all of its instructions, and then resume in this template rule." This lets you rewrite the stylesheet above like this, with the same effect:


<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
     version="2.0">

    <xsl:template match="member[@joinDate='2003-10-03']">
      <p>(founding member)</p>
      <xsl:next-match/>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="member[substring(@joinDate,1,4) = '2005']">
      <p>(new member)</p>
      <xsl:next-match/>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="member">
      <p><xsl:apply-templates/></p>
    </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

When either the first or second template rule here is triggered, it outputs the p element shown and then triggers the third template rule.

It's best to use short examples in this kind of article, and the examples above are so short that the difference between the last two stylesheets seems trivial. You'll find that the usefulness of the xsl:next-match instruction becomes clearer as the amount of program logic to execute scales up. When you have different combinations of large blocks of instructions to execute on a set of nodes, putting these blocks inside of xsl:if instructions or the xsl:when children of xsl:choose elements makes a stylesheet increasingly difficult to read. When you combine the conditional processing made possible by carefully chosen match conditions with the template rule chaining allowed by xsl:next-match, you can have a much more elegant, readable solution. For even greater control over the relationship between the calling and the called templates, you can add xsl:with-param children to the xsl:next-match element to pass parameters, just like you can with named templates. (See my earlier column Setting and Using Variables and Parameters for an introduction to this.)

The same section of the XSLT 2.0 specification that covers xsl:next-match covers a related instruction: xsl:apply-imports. To understand its value, let's first review xsl:include and xsl:import instructions: both tell an XSLT processor to treat the identified file as part of the stylesheet with the xsl:include or xsl:import instruction. The latter lets you override template rules from the imported stylesheet, making it great for creating personal customizations of large, complex stylesheets. For example, you can import Norm Walsh's Docbook stylesheets and then, after the xsl:import instruction, add revised versions of the template rules that you've customized for yourself. (See my earlier column Combining Stylesheets with Include and Import for further review with examples.)

If the template rule that you overrode was long and complex and you just wanted to override one or two details in an XSLT 1.0 stylesheet, you had to copy the whole thing into your importing stylesheet and then change those details. The xsl:apply-imports instruction gives you a new option: it lets the overriding template rule call the imported stylesheet's overridden one. If your overriding template rule only needs to add a few things to the result of the overridden one, you can add them before and after an xsl:apply-imports instruction and let the imported template rule do the rest of the work. This instruction also lets you add xsl:with-param children, giving the overriding template rule even greater control over the behavior of the overridden one.

Controlling the Flow

The pull approach to XSLT stylesheet development may give the illusion of greater control because of its resemblance to a declarative programming style, but it often results in some quirky surprises that frustrate many stylesheet developers. The push approach offers several tools to navigate the natural flow of an XSLT processor's handling of a source tree, and XSLT 2.0's xsl:next-match and xsl:apply-imports instructions are two tools that should make the push approach more attractive.



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  1. #1 Locksmith Locks Services Company Los Angeles call 1-323-678-2704 Locksmith
    2009-06-11 14:49:58 whats
  2. Design Choice
    2005-09-30 14:50:04 JackParker
  3. other benefits from push style
    2005-07-07 03:09:49 Avander_be
  4. xsl:apply-imports is not new
    2005-07-07 01:33:29 Sjoerd Visscher
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